(of the curious type)
Mostly art + bits and pieces of my own work and notes
(of the curious type)
": Each work emerges as something that perhaps shouldn't be called a photograph but is because of the technical process by which it was made. When it comes down to it, are they photographs? I'm not sure. It seems that we need another name to describe them." Q+A with Barbara Kasten - Interviews - Art in America
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lafilleblanc:

Barbara Kasten
Photogenic Painting Untitled 75/301975. Cyanotype. 
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tommmmo:

Barbara Kasten, Construct PC/III-A, Polaroid, 1981
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jennilee:

From early examples of books by Edward Steichen, to publications by Alec Soth and Tierney Gearon, photobooks for children are not a new phenomenon. Last year, The British Journal of Photography featured a report on a new wave of childrens’ books. It identified that, although children are engaging with the language of photography at an increasingly young age, it may be a difficult medium to use for the making of childrens’ books, as such publications encourage young readers to use their imaginations to build stories, and photography cannot escape its indexical or direct link to the world of fact. With this in mind, it is clear photography needs to be employed by childrens’ book makers in engaging and creative ways, teaching children not just to look at images but how to read them too, be them factual or fictional. Enter Jason Fulford. His typically playful approach to image-making has seen him create books that are puzzles; books that play with word association and books that invite us to solve visual conundrums. In This Equals That – his new book for children made in collaboration with graphic designer Tamara Shopsin and published by Aperture Foundation – he works with a similar formula. The clever pairing of images build a small encyclopaedia of visual associations and equations, and encourage readers to think about number, shape and colour and the lovely ways in which fragments of the world mirror each other and slot together. Though made as a childrens’ book, This Equals That is a puzzle that we can take pleasure in solving at any age, as we consider how the colours of flowers reflect those in stained glass windows, or the curve of an orange relates to a small hole in the sand. (via This Equals That: Jason Fulford and Tamara Shopsin | BLOG - The Photographers’ Gallery)

Can’t wait to see this childrens’ photo book!
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lintrolled:

Matthew Shrier: “David, A Muse & Restriction”
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michelleleewallace:

Another woman in the window, this one by André Kertész
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"I have a quote on the back of my Camden Arts Centre pamphlet File Notes—it’s by Fassbinder, where he says, “… the more ‘honestly’ you put yourself into the story, the more that story will concern others as well.” Maybe it’s another way to think about it, this paradox or slightly counter-intuitive notion that the more “personal” or subjective or individuated you are as a writer or artist, the greater will be the number of readers or viewers who might be touched by, or spoken to, or interpolated by what you say."
Moyra Davey, from her interview with Elisabeth Lebovici (via bombmagazine)
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theparisreview:

“Artists or not, we are all constantly engaged in trying to make sense of our surroundings—in figuring out how or if everything is connected, somehow, to everything else.”
Chris Pomorski on Sherwood Anderson; Clyde, Ohio; and the mythologies of small towns.
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roryrosenberg:

North Beach Asbury Park, Asbury Park, NJ, 5/19/2012 Studio Series Acrylic Gesso and Laser Etching on Pre-Primed Panel

Check out Rory’s piece at Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia
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michelleleewallace:

Brigantine, NJ
2014
lab scan/unedited
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michelleleewallace:

Double exposed flowers, Brigantine, NJ 2014
Lab scan/unedited
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great finds from the other day
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The wall text at the PMA for this photo forever changed the way I will look at this image. “Palpable metaphor for sexual sensation.” The way those lines converge at the bulb, all that sexual excitement, electricity running to that bulb… Could not stop laughing, museums and their wall text, you gotta watch what you display!
The wall text at the PMA for this photo forever changed the way I will look at this image. “Palpable metaphor for sexual sensation.” The way those lines converge at the bulb, all that sexual excitement, electricity running to that bulb… Could not stop laughing, museums and their wall text, you gotta watch what you display!