(of the curious type)
Mostly art + bits and pieces of my own work and notes
(of the curious type)
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"The dynamic between a sense of materiality on one hand, and an awareness of how images relate to other images (historical, commercial, or contemporary) on another, is what characterizes a strong facet of contemporary photographic practice—–more so than a relationship to early modernism."
Carter Mull in response to Kevin Moore’s essay foRm in Words Without Pictures
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CARTER MULL
Autopoetics and Wire
2012
Type C-Print on gloss paper and laminated Type-C prints.
64 x 66 inches, framed
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CARTER MULL
Ground
2006
1,800 office jet prints, holographic film, aerosol paint, unique.
dimensions variable for installation.
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emptystretch:

We interviewed Benjamin Davis over on the blog. 
http://crybabydiamond.tumblr.com/post/96379300687/im-sitting-on-ramseys-back-porch-its-sunny
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edspence:

Noise Bouquet

16” x 20”, Collage on panel
2013
Ed Spence
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greatleapsideways:

“Everything is surface in this pictorial autobiography, and despite its undeniable flair and technical eloquence, it asks relatively little of us as viewers. In 1985, Douglas Crimp wrote that “[a]ppropriation, pastiche, quotation – these methods extend to virtually every aspect of our culture, from the most cynically calculated products of the fashion and entertainment industries to the most committed critical activities of artists.” It seems to me that these images are premised on our capacity to detect and to delight in irony, or in aesthetic terms to delight in the reigning gesture of formal distortion. However, the satirical energy of these images reconfirms the power of their objects, rather than working them over into a point of crisis or absurdity. At best this might imply that in the realm of autobiography, memory is always rose-tinted. At worst this neutrality disguises a glibness that can offer us little substance.”
— from “Between Affect and Apathy: Roe Ethridge’s Sacrifice Your Body”, just published at thegreatleapsideways.com
greatleapsideways:

“Everything is surface in this pictorial autobiography, and despite its undeniable flair and technical eloquence, it asks relatively little of us as viewers. In 1985, Douglas Crimp wrote that “[a]ppropriation, pastiche, quotation – these methods extend to virtually every aspect of our culture, from the most cynically calculated products of the fashion and entertainment industries to the most committed critical activities of artists.” It seems to me that these images are premised on our capacity to detect and to delight in irony, or in aesthetic terms to delight in the reigning gesture of formal distortion. However, the satirical energy of these images reconfirms the power of their objects, rather than working them over into a point of crisis or absurdity. At best this might imply that in the realm of autobiography, memory is always rose-tinted. At worst this neutrality disguises a glibness that can offer us little substance.”
— from “Between Affect and Apathy: Roe Ethridge’s Sacrifice Your Body”, just published at thegreatleapsideways.com
greatleapsideways:

“Everything is surface in this pictorial autobiography, and despite its undeniable flair and technical eloquence, it asks relatively little of us as viewers. In 1985, Douglas Crimp wrote that “[a]ppropriation, pastiche, quotation – these methods extend to virtually every aspect of our culture, from the most cynically calculated products of the fashion and entertainment industries to the most committed critical activities of artists.” It seems to me that these images are premised on our capacity to detect and to delight in irony, or in aesthetic terms to delight in the reigning gesture of formal distortion. However, the satirical energy of these images reconfirms the power of their objects, rather than working them over into a point of crisis or absurdity. At best this might imply that in the realm of autobiography, memory is always rose-tinted. At worst this neutrality disguises a glibness that can offer us little substance.”
— from “Between Affect and Apathy: Roe Ethridge’s Sacrifice Your Body”, just published at thegreatleapsideways.com
greatleapsideways:

“Everything is surface in this pictorial autobiography, and despite its undeniable flair and technical eloquence, it asks relatively little of us as viewers. In 1985, Douglas Crimp wrote that “[a]ppropriation, pastiche, quotation – these methods extend to virtually every aspect of our culture, from the most cynically calculated products of the fashion and entertainment industries to the most committed critical activities of artists.” It seems to me that these images are premised on our capacity to detect and to delight in irony, or in aesthetic terms to delight in the reigning gesture of formal distortion. However, the satirical energy of these images reconfirms the power of their objects, rather than working them over into a point of crisis or absurdity. At best this might imply that in the realm of autobiography, memory is always rose-tinted. At worst this neutrality disguises a glibness that can offer us little substance.”
— from “Between Affect and Apathy: Roe Ethridge’s Sacrifice Your Body”, just published at thegreatleapsideways.com
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frontyardbooks:

Front Yard’s first digital exhibition (The Other Story) is now live!Featuring work by Thomas Albdorf, Ying Ang, Lewis Chaplin, Patrick Driscoll, Lindsay Metivier, Caroline Schub, and David Zilber.Take a moment to explore these exciting narrative compositions!Featured image: Lindsay Metivier
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bombmagazine:

Luis Camnitzer, This is a Mirror, You are a Written Sentence, 1966-68, vacuum-formed polystyrene mounted on synthetic board, 18 4/5 x 24 3/5 x ½ “. Photo by Peter Schälchli, Zurich.

Art thinking should have the same overarching role that logical thinking has. Art has slowly deteriorated to become primarily a form of production instead of a way of shaping culture. Thus, it is viewed as a discipline and not as a methodology. I see art as the area where one can and should make “illicit” connections, connections that are not allowed in disciplinary, fragmented thinking. Art illuminates them through questioning and allows (though not necessarily) for their possible affirmation after a critical and imaginative evaluation.
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bombmagazine:

Luis Camnitzer, Real Edge of the Line that Divides Reality from Fiction, 1974-75, mixed media, 13½ x 9 7/8 x 2”. Photo by Peter Schälchli, Zurich.
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manyfacepalms:

greatleapsideways:

It was really strange to stumble across this black & white version of a recent Gregory Halpern photograph from his ongoing California project. I say strange because the photographs in that project are colour photographs, and somehow this one is not… The situation becomes stranger still when one considers that the photograph, as it was posted, is credited to Gregory Halpern (in the tags to the post), but looks nothing like the version he has published on his own site (see below).
The blog on which this mystery black & white version was posted seems to consist almost entirely of black & white images, which might suggest a strong preference at the very least. But if this image has been downloaded and converted to b/w, it can hardly be accredited to an artist who had nothing to do with its conversion, can it?
Something of a mystery…

Photograph © Gregory Halpern, from “California”.

Tumblr EXIF suggests the BW version is a scan. So maybe it was printed in BW in a book and scanned by the blogger?


Internet mysteries and photographic quandaries
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aintbadmagazine:

theoxfordamerican:

For this week’s Eyes on the South, Jeff Rich interviews Ain’t-Bad Magazine's Carson Sanders about a photo collection that features several EOTS contributors. Read it—and see some of Ain’t-Bad's wonderful images—here.

I’m extremely excited to be included in the soon to be released Aint-Bad Magazine Issue 8: The American South. Featured artist Jeff Rich talks with Aint-Bad editor Carson Sanders. 

Yay Keith!
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oranbeg:

Check out Oranbeg NET 08 Contemporary Youth! Curated by Dean Davies of TRIP Mag. 
Featuring: Heather Iris Galt-Mcloughlin, Jordan Baumgarten, Ashley Catharine Smith, Colleen Mann, Mitch Borden, Zora Murff, Sarah Anthony, Jeff Dietz, Tammy Mercure, Benjamin Davis, Eleanor Bleier, Rachel Woroner, Amiko Li, Stephanie Noritz, Landon Speers,D’Angelo Williams, Lana Z Caplan, Matt MacPake, Michelle Groskopf, Gorsad, Cecilia Ferraro, Alyssa Kazew, Nathan Pearce, David Whyte, Hannah Abel-Hirsch, Erin Geideman, Moby Howeidy and Carisa Mitchell.
Thanks again to everyone who submitted work and to Dean for curating a great show. 
Also, we will be showcasing NET 8 Contemporary Youth during Last Call @ Dossier Outpost on our projection screen from 6-10pm in conjunction with our exhibitions Fresh Detectives and Thesaurus! 
And you can now submit your work to Oranbeg NET 09 Personal Space with Curator Trevor Powers! 
Deadline is September 23, 2014 at 11:59pm.

Yay mitchkebab!